Mocachi

Representative monoliths of the Pajano/Yaya-Mama style, in the restrictive sense of those terms. (a) Monolith from Tambo Kusi/Corralpata, Bolivia, after Portugal Ortíz (1998:Figure 86); (b) monolith from Mocachi, Copacabana Peninsula, Peru, after Casanova (1942:Figure 3); (c) triangular monolith from Lakaripata, Santiago de Huata, Bolivia, after Lémuz (2001:Figure 8.1); (d) the Yaya-Mama monolith from Taraco, Peru, after Chávez and Mohr Chávez (1975:Figure 1b). Composite drawing by Arik Ohnstad.
The four carved stone monoliths of Khonkho Wankane. Drawing by Arik Ohnstad.
Khonkho Wankane’s Portugal monolith. Drawing by Arik Ohnstad.
The Wila Kala monolith. Drawing by Arik Ohnstad.
Khonkho Wankane’s Jinch’un Kala monolith. Drawing by Arik Ohnstad.
The Tata Kala monolith. Drawing by Arik Ohnstad.
Comparison of Mocachi monoliths, including (a) general layout for design details on their fronts, sides, and backs, and iconography on (b) the Bearded monolith; (c) the Mocachi monolith, from Casanova (1942:Figure 3); and (d) the Waka Kala stela. Drawings by Arik Ohnstad.
Wila Kala and Jinch’un Kala, combined. Drawing by Arik Ohnstad and John Janusek.
Photos of Tiwanaku’s Pajano monoliths, including the (a) Bearded monolith, (b) Ídolo Plano, and (c) Headless monolith. Photos by Arthur Posnansky, John Janusek, and Carlos Ponce Sanginés, respectively.
A selected sample of stone sculpture showing the circumlacustrine distribution of the “early” version of the Yaya-Mama style. The drawings are not at the same scale and are based on photographs and original rubbings by Karen and Sergio Chávez.