Early Yaya-Mama

A selected sample of stone sculpture showing the circumlacustrine distribution of the “early” version of the Yaya-Mama style. The drawings are not at the same scale and are based on photographs and original rubbings by Karen and Sergio Chávez.
Photograph of the Yaya-Mama semi-subterranean temple of Ch’isi, taken right after excavations, consolidation, and reconstruction of the stone walls. Note the peripheral features above and around the sunken court. Photograph by Karen and Sergio Chávez.
Photograph of the four-step and flanking slabs at the entrance of the Yaya-Mama semi-subterranean temple of Ch’isi. Note the only carving in direct association with excavated and dated architecture. Photograph by Karen and Sergio Chávez.
The grinding slab from Chiripa (53 × 37.5 cm) of the southern “early” version of the Yaya-Mama style, showing the obverse a head with volutes and foot appendages and a cross formée on the reverse. Drawing based on photographs and rubbing by Sergio Chávez.
The grinding slab from Copacabana (36 x 29.2 cm) of the southern “early” version of the Yaya-Mama style, showing motifs and designs similar to those on the Chiripa grinding slab. Drawing by Sergio Chávez from photographs provided by Margaret Young-Sánchez and the Museum für Völkerkunde.
Continuities in a selection of Yaya-Mama style iconography as it develops into “Classic” Tiahuanaco style. The lower portion represents “early” and “late” Yaya-Mama motifs and designs in pottery and stone; the middle shows examples of “transitional” images depicted on snuff tablets, Provincial Pucara textiles, and stone carvings; the upper portion represents motifs and designs from the Gateway of the Kalasasaya, the Bennett, Ponce, and Kochamama stelae, including two examples of statues known as chachapuma. The two motifs on the upper left derive from a Huari tapestry published by Isbell and Knobloch (2009:Figure 5). Line drawings by Sergio Chávez.