Sculpture

Metal disc of unknown origin. Collection of Museo de Artes Visuales, Santiago (from the Exhibition Catalogue Chile Indígena, 1991).
Principal deity represented in the decorations on the unku worn by the Bennett monolith. Note the particular characteristics of the feathers in the halo and the objects in both hands, which are not staffs. Drawing by Carlos Herrera.
A ch’allador with a snake as its only decorative element. Photo by Antti Korpisaari.
Pedestal bowl featuring a serpent rising from the center of the bowl. Photo by Martti Pärssinen.
Pedestal bowl with the spout representing the tail of a rattlesnake. Photo by Antti Korpisaari.
Pariti portrait vessel of a male wearing a helmet. Photo by Martti Pärssinen.
Map showing the main examples of Yaya-Mama stone sculpture redrawn by Martti Pärssinen after Bouysse-Cassagne and Bouysse (1988:Figure 6).
Wari female figurine or effigy. This example lacks the well-modeled attributes evident in some figurines and is not depicted as nude. Instead, she has a carefully painted dress with white underskirt and a decorated hem, belt, and collar held in place by a set of three tupu pins. Similar to many Nasca and Paracas figurines, her face is decorated with “tear marks,” in this case executed in red slip. Like most votive figurines, her arms are placidly placed across the chest/abdomen. Drawn from photo (Young-Sanchez 2004:153, Figure 6.1, colors approximate, specimen represents American Museum of Natural History, New York 41.2/8596).
Photo of head of small ceramic figurine from the site of Iwawi, Bolivia. The fragment dates to the Tiwanaku period and was found in domestic contexts. Like female figurines from other contexts, it has long, center-parted hair; traces of black slip/paint still remain. A possibly unique Tiwanaku trait may be the strongly emphasized chin, which here protrudes past the nose. Original photo courtesy of the Iwawi Archaeological Project.
Bas relief decoration on the back of the Bennett monolith: two faces with halos on their respective podiums. Photo by Daniel Giannoni.

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